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3 Aunt Sally's Individual Creamy Pralines

3 Aunt Sally's Individual Creamy Pralines
Quantity in Basket: None
Code: ASP1
Price: $7.99
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Aunt Sally's Individually Wrapped Creamy Pecan Pralines.
Right from the heart of New Orleans!

All of Aunt Sally’s Pralines and Pralinettes are 100% gluten-free and kosher

More About Aunt Sally's Pralines
Sweet Pralines bubbling in an old copper pot. The click-clack of a horse-drawn carriage on a cobblestone street. Jazz drifting from an ancient doorway. The rich taste of gumbo. The first bite of a hot, fresh beignet. The smell of sweet pralines still warm from the kitchen. These are the sights, sounds and flavors that make up New Orleans. This is what the founders of Aunt Sally's® Pralines wanted to share with the world.

Pierre and Diane Bagur were both second generation New Orleanians of French Creole descent with a vision to share the mystique of their hometown, New Orleans. In the early 1930's, they opened their first shop in the French Quarter. The store resembled a log cabin and they selected their merchandise to remind visitors of the city's charms, rich history and delights. Among these items were the unique Creole candies called "pralines." With the help of talented candymakers, the Bagurs developed their own delicate version of New Orleans' signature candy, which they made over a gas stove in a copper pot, hand-pouring praline after praline onto marble surfaces. The pralines at Aunt Sally's® Praline Shop are made the same way today.

The Aunt Sally's® Pralines were sold individually or in packs of six or twelve, carried in hand-made cotton bales by vendors who rode a mule-drawn buggies throughout the French Quarter. Even in the early years of Aunt Sally's® Praline Shop, visitors requested and received praline shipments by mail worldwide, long before mail order became popular. Today, visitors may see what a New York Times reporter recently acclaimed as the city's best pralines, or "disks of pure joy" being made daily at 810 Decatur Street in the historic French Quarter at the corner of Jackson Square and next to Cafe du Monde.

Years later, the third and fourth generations of the Bagur family are dedicated to carrying out Pierre and Diane's dream. It is our home, our past, our future and the heart and soul of what we do. We proudly share our unique delicacy and deep roots with every person who wants to experience what we love and cherish-the most heavenly pralines you will ever taste.

Early History
New Orleans style pralines originated in 18th century France, thanks to the sweet-tooth French Marshal and Diplomat Cesar du Plessis-Praslin (pronounced prah-lin). His chef invented a recipe that included sugar-coating almonds to be consumed as a digestive aid. He named the confection a "praline," after Marshal Praslin. Today, the word "praline" is common throughout France and Belgium to describe any confection made with nuts.